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All Posts in Category: Testing

PLAC Test – a clever way to check your cardiovascular risk

Cholesterol testing alone is not enough - 50% of heart attacks occur in patients with normal cholesterol.

Arteries are blood vessels that supply oxygen-rich blood to your heart and other parts of your body. Atherosclerosis is a disease in the arteries in which the build-up of plaque can decrease blood flow to the heart or brain.Plaque is made up of fat, cholesterol and other substances found in the blood. Over time, the amount of plaque can increase, causing narrowing of the arteries. When this happens, it is more difficult for the blood to flow.

The majority of heart attacks and ischaemic strokes are caused by ruptured plaques.

When the plaque ruptures, the flow of blood to the heart or brain can become blocked, which results in a heart attack or stroke. 

The PLAC Test goes beyond what routine cholesterol testing can do by identifying active cardiovascular inflammatory disease. The PLAC Test measures an enzyme that, when elevated, indicates arterial inflammation, making heart attack or stroke more likely.The PLAC Test provides additional information that, when combined with standard cholesterol tests and an exam, can help determine whether or not you are at an increased risk for a heart attack or stroke.

A PLAC test can be useful if you have two or more of the following risk factors:

  • Male 45 years or older or female 55 years or older
  • Family history of early heart disease or stroke
  • Diabetes
  • Obesity
  • Smoker
  • Borderline high or elevated cholesterol levels

Are You at risk of a heart attack or stroke?

The PLAC test is part of our Comprehensive Heart Risk Assessment.

Source: http://placelisa.com/

Cholesterol testing alone is not enough.
50% of heart attacks occur in patients with normal cholesterol.
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Bedwetting

Babies need to be in nappies as they cannot control their bladder. As they get older and turn into little people their nervous system is moving along nicely and the frequency of bedwetting goes down and eventually stops. 

Bedwetting is one of the most common disorders among children. It occurs in up to 20% of 5 year olds and 10% of 10 year olds, with a spontaneous remission rate of 14% per year. Weekly daytime wetting occurs in 5% of children, most of whom (80%) also wet the bed. Approximately 5% to 10% of all seven-year-olds have enuresis.

The reasons for bedwetting involve the inability to awaken from sleep in response to a full bladder, coupled with excessive nighttime urine production or a decreased functional capacity of the bladder.​

​Children who wet the bed may do so for emotional reasons. They may feel insecure due to the arrival of a new baby, a change of school or because of the parents' marital problems. In these cases, the child needs love and reassurance.

Why do some children have a problem?

There are numerous possible reasons why children - and their families - suffer from bedwetting: 

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  • Slower central nervous system development
  • Food allergies or intolerances
  • Infections (kidney or bladder)
  • Diabetes
  • Excess water consumption prior to bed
  • Being scared of the dark
  • Laziness
  • Side effects of medication
  • Caffeine (some give this to their kids – and I highly suggest not doing it), e.g in tea, coffee and many fizzy drinks

Vitamin B12, folate and iron levels 

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Pak J Med Sci. 2015 Jan-Feb; 31(1): 87–90.Pak J Med Sci. 2015 Jan-Feb; 31(1): 87–90

A study from 2012 found significantly lower mean vitamin B(12) and folate levels in patients who suffered from bed wetting. These findings were confirmed in a study in 2015 which also identified that average blood iron was significantly higher. 

​Common strategies to help with bedwetting

  • Shift times for drinking. Increase fluid intake earlier in the day and reduce it later in the day.
  • Schedule bathroom breaks. Get your child on a regular urination schedule (every two to three hours) and right before bedtime.
  • Be encouraging. Make your child feel good about progress by consistently rewarding successes.
  • Eliminate bladder irritants. At night, start by eliminating caffeine (such as chocolate milk and cocoa) and if this doesn’t work, cut citrus juices, artificial flavorings, dyes (especially red) and sweeteners. Many parents don’t realize these can all irritate a child’s bladder.
  • Avoid thirst overload. If schools allow, give your child a water bottle so they can drink steadily all day. This avoids excessive thirst after school.
  • Consider if constipation is a factor. Because the rectum is right behind the bladder, difficulties with constipation can present themselves as a bladder problem, especially at night. This affects about one third of children who wet the bed, though children are unlikely to identify or share information about constipation.
  • Don’t wake children up to urinate. Randomly waking up a child at night and asking him or her to urinate on demand isn’t the answer, either – and will only lead to more sleeplessness and frustration.
  • Don’t resort to punishment. Getting angry at your child doesn’t help him learn. The process doesn’t need to involve conflict.

What can you do to identify the cause of bedwetting in your child?

  • Identify food allergies and remove (gluten and dairy are big)
  • Avoid caffeine and fizzy drinks
  • Limit intake of water and fluids prior to bed
  • Always have them go for a whee right before bed
  • Use a night light 
  • Star board (get a star for each night they don’t wet their bed and a prize at X stars)
  • Taking off their bedsheets self and taking them to the laundry
  • Supplement with Fish oil
  • Give a Multivitamin
  • Give a Probiotic
  • Give a methylated B-complex

A known cause of bedwetting is slower development of the central nervous system + low b12 and low folate contribute to a slowed central nervous system = increased susceptibility to nocturnal enuresis (ie. bedwetting).

If one has low folate and low B12, then their methylation system is going to be less functional.

As their methylation is not up to speed, then the development of the CNS is hindered.

As the CNS development is hindered, so is the nervous system of the bladder which leads to nocturnal enuresis.

Restoring nutrients for CNS development is critical to reducing bedwetting.

The younger the child, the more development they are experiencing. The more development they are experiencing, the more methylation they are utilizing. The more methylation they are utilizing, the more nutrients they require to support methylation.

If the child’s methylation is not supported with nutrients, then bedwetting may show up.

Before you start blindly supplementing your child we would highly recommend to arrange some of the following tests which are all available from CountryHealth:

Which Lab Tests can be useful?

Do you want your child to be tested?

We are keen to help you finding the root causes of bedwetting in your child

Why do some kids get dry and others struggle with bedwetting?

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