TELEMEDICINE Thyroid Health Practice with a Functional Medicine Approach

Opening Hours : Monday to Thursday: 9:00-12:00 & 13:00-16:00 Friday: 9:00-12:00
  Contact : Tel: 01449 833833 or 07771 448559 - email: reception@countryhealth.co.uk

All Posts in Category: Thyroid

Brain dysfunction and Thyroid function


Thyroid dysfunction is frequently associated with functional disturbances of the brain such as cognitive impairment1, neurodegenerative disorders2, dementia3, depression, and anxiety4. Transient thyroid dysfunction may also induce neuropsychiatric changes5

Functional neuroimaging studies suggest a direct association between thyroid and brain activity, therefore, these can provide some clues of underlying mechanisms of thyroid hormones on psychological and physiological effects on the brain.

Specific thyroid hormone enzymes, transporters and receptors are believed to maintain thyroid hormone homeostasis in the brain2123. Therefore, current laboratory tests for thyroid dysfunction may not accurately measure thyroid hormone status in the brain8,2123

Scientists from Korea used functional neuroimaging techniques of positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to study the underlying mechanisms of action of thyroid hormones, the use of sugar and blood flow in the brain. 8

In hypothyroidism, significant decreases in blood sugar metabolism in the brain were identified in 3 parts of the brain [the blue dots]. In hyperthyroidism, a significant decrease was identified in 1 cluster [the red dot]:

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They also found a reduced blood flow in one area in hypothyroidism. 

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These areas play an important role in affective and cognitive regulation, involving attention, problem solving, motivation, error detection, decision making, and social behaviors24,25

Metabolic and perfusion deficits in these area can affect working memory and attention, written word recognition, transient memory retrieval, awareness and imagery of visuospatial input, and priming processes, often compromised in patients with hypothyroidism28.

In a small study thyroid hormone replacement therapy caused a reduction in the somatic complaints and depressive symptoms associated with a restoration of metabolic activity in the brain18.

Another study demonstrated that the blood flow in affected brain areas can be normalised after treating hypothyroidism26

In patients with hyperthyroidism treatment  increased regional activity in these regions and these changes significantly correlated with the anxiety and depressive symptoms13.

These results suggest that thyroid hormones regulate the use of glucose and blood circulation in certain areas of the brain. These findings also demonstrate that the mechanism of neuropsychiatric disturbances in patients with hypothyroidism differs from those with hyperthyroidism.

Source:

Pak K, Kim M, Kim K, Kim BH, Kim SJ, Kim IJ. Cerebral glucose metabolism and Cerebral blood flow in thyroid dysfunction: An Activation Likelihood Estimation Meta-analysis. Sci Rep. 2020;10(1):1335. Published 2020 Jan 28. doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58255-5
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6987231/

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Thyroid Awareness week 20.-26.10.2018

Thyroid Awareness Week is held to raise awareness of thyroid disease.

Thyroid disorders are relatively rare in infants and children. Nevertheless, being aware of their symptoms is vital to allow early diagnosis and treatment.

We found this very engaging child-friendly video from Thyroid Aware to look into thyroid problems in children:

 

It is also available as a little e-book: Storybook for Children

Resources: https://www.thyroidaware.com/en/resources/child_disorder.html

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Thyroid Retreat Days

For the first time everything required for a unique and bespoke residential program for clients with thyroid health problems will be available under one roof. Ours.

The thyroid system plays a critical role in your metabolism. Along with insulin and cortisol, your thyroid hormone is one of the big three hormones that control your metabolism and weight.

We have been running a successful Thyroid Clinic and learned that accurate testing, supplements and medication is often not enough.

Lifestyle changes are paramount to improve chronic health conditions and cannot be taught in a report or a short consultation.

This is why we created the Thyroid Retreat Days. We want to give our clients all the tools they need to make them feel better, after already implementing medication and supplements.

Our motto is: learning with fun

Cooking Workshops

From healthy breakfasts to dinner party food – you will learn how to make delicious and thyroid friendly food – quickly.

Seminars

Learn in several very interactive workshops what makes you tired, the links between adrenal fatigue, thyroid health, Hashimotos’ and how to drum up your metabolism.

Sleep Well

Have a cosy night in a sumptuous room and wake up refreshed, ready for the next day.

Relaxation

From Mindfulness to Reflexology – a healthy mind makes a healthy body.

Evening Entertainment

Murder Mystery, Bingo and Rat Race are only a few events to keep you entertained.

Download our brochure and call Dena on 01473 218 373 or 01449 833 833 NOW to book your slot.

Only 6 places per event available!

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Why you struggle to lose weight on a diet

Successful weight loss is doomed to failure unless the reduced intracellular thyroid levels are addressed. Chronic and yo-yo dieting, frequently done by a large percentage of the population, is shown to be associated with reduced cellular T4 uptake of 25%-50% (2-7). Following repeated cycles of dieting, weight loss occurred at half the rate and weight gain occurred at three times the rate compared to controls with the same calorie intake (1). The reduced cellular thyroid level is generally not detected by standard laboratory testing unless a free T3/reverse T3 ratio is done.

Finally a study explained why it is very difficult for obese patients to lose weight; as calories are decreased, thyroid utilisation is reduced and metabolism drops. Additionally, there are increased levels of free fatty acids in the serum with chronic dieting, which further suppresses T4 uptake into the cells and further cellular hypothyroidism (8-12).

In a study published in the American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology and Metabolism, Van der Heyden et al studied the effect of calorie restriction (dieting) on the transport of T4 and T3 into the cell (13). It was found that dieting obese individuals had a 50% reduction of T4 into the cell and a 25% reduction of T3 into the cell due to the reduced cellular energy stores, demonstrating that in such patients standard thyroid blood tests are not accurate indicators of intracellular thyroid levels.

Many overweight individuals fail to lose weight with dieting. While it is always assumed they are doing a poor job of dieting, it has been shown, however, that chronic dieting in overweight individuals results in increased levels of NEFA, which suppresses T4 uptake into the cells (14). This suppressed T4 uptake results in reduced intracellular T4 levels and subsequent T4 to T3 conversion and a reduced metabolism (14-18).

How you can find out, whether you are affected?

Standard TSH, T4 and T3 testing will not detect this problem. Instead, a free T3/reverse T3 blood test can aid in the diagnosis of reduced uptake of thyroid hormones and intracellular hypothyroidism. It is proving to be the best physiologic marker of intracellular thyroid levels and supplementation with T3 should be considered.

References:

  1. Brownell KD, Greenwood MR, Stellar E, Shrager EE. The effects of repeated cycles of weight loss and regain in rats. Physiol Behav 1986;38(4):459-64.
  2. Lim C-F, Docter R, Krenning EP, et al. Transport of thyroxine into cultured hepatocytes: effects of mild nonthyroidal illness and calorie restriction in obese subjects. Clin Endocrinol (Oxf) 1994;40:79-85.
  3. van der Heyden JT, Docter R, van Toor H, et al. Effects of caloric deprivation on thyroid hormone tissue uptake and generation of low-T3 syndrome. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 1986;251(2):156-E163.
  4. Leibel RL, Jirsch J. Diminshed energy requirements in reduced-obese patients. Metabolism 1984;33(2):164-170.
  5. Elliot DL, Goldberg L, Kuehl KD, Bennett WM. Sustained depression of the resting metabolic rate after massive weight loss. Am J Clin Nutr 1989;49:93-6.
  6. Manore MM, Berry TE, Skinner JS, Carroll SS. Energy expenditure at rest and during exercise in nonobese female cyclical dieters and in nondieting control subjects. Am J Clin Nutr 1991;54:41-6.
  7. Croxson MS, Ibbertson HK, Low serum triiodothyronine (T3) and hypothyroidism in anorexia nervosa. J Clin Endorinol Metab 1977;44:167-174.
  8. Brehm A, Krssak M, Schmid AI, Nowothy P, et al. Increased Lipid Availability Impairs Insulin-Stimulated ATP Synthesis in Human Skeletal Muscle. Diabetes 2006;55:136-140.
  9. DeMarco NM, Beitz DC, Whitehurst GB. Effect of fasting on free fatty acid, glycerol and cholesterol concentrations in blood plasma and lipoprotein lipase activity in adipose tissue of cattle. J Anim Sci 1981;52:75-82.
  10. Lim C-F, Bernard BF, De Jong M, et al. A furan fatty acid and indoxyl sulfate are the putative inhibitors of thyroxine hepatocyte transport in uremia. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 1993;76:318-324.
  11. Lim C-F, Docter R, Visser TJ, Krenning EP, Bernard B, et al. Inhibition of thyroxine transport into cultured rat hepatocytes by serum of non-uremic critically ill patients: Effects of bilirubin and nonesterified fatty acids. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 1993;76:1165-1172.
  12. Elliot DL, Goldberg L, Kuehl KD, Bennett WM. Sustained depression of the resting metabolic rate after massive weight loss. Am J Clin Nutr 1989;49:93-6.
  13. van der Heyden JT, Docter R, van Toor H, et al. Effects of caloric deprivation on thyroid hormone tissue uptake and generation of low-T3 syndrome. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 1986;251(2):156-E163.
  14. Lim C-F, Docter R, Krenning EP, et al. Transport of thyroxine into cultured hepatocytes: effects of mild nonthyroidal illness and calorie restriction in obese subjects. Clin Endocrinol (Oxf) 1994;40:79-85.
  15. Leibel RL, Jirsch J. Diminshed energy requirements in reduced-obese patients. Metabolism 1984;33(2):164-170.
  16. Elliot DL, Goldberg L, Kuehl KD, Bennett WM. Sustained depression of the resting metabolic rate after massive weight loss. Am J Clin Nutr 1989;49:93-6.
  17. Manore MM, Berry TE, Skinner JS, Carroll SS. Energy expenditure at rest and during exercise in nonobese female cyclical dieters and in nondieting control subjects. Am J Clin Nutr 1991;54:41-6.
  18. Croxson MS, Ibbertson HK, Low serum triiodothyronine (T3) and hypothyroidism in anorexia nervosa. J Clin Endorinol Metab 1977;44:167-174.
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